Category Archives: Gargani News

AfrEA Conference 2014 #2: Commitment, Community, and Change

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The 2014 Conference of the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) was just opened. Organizers delayed the start of the opening ceremony, however, as they waited for the arrival of officials from the government of Cameroon. Fifteen minutes. Thirty minutes. An hour. More.

This may sound like a problem, but it wasn’t—the unofficial conference had already begun. Participants from around the world were mixing, laughing, and learning. I met evaluators from Kenya, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Europe, and America. I learned about health programs, education systems, evaluation use in government, and the development of evaluation as a profession across the continent. It was a truly delightful delay.

And it reflects the mindset I am finding here—a strong belief that commitment and community can overcome circumstance.

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During the opening ceremony, the Former President of AGRA, Dr. Namanga Ngongi, stated that one of the greatest challenges facing development programs is finding enough qualified evaluators—those who not only  have technical skills, but also the ability to help organizations increase their impact.

Where will these much-needed evaluators come from?

Historically, many evaluators have come from outside of Africa. The current push for made-in-Africa evaluations promises to change that by training more African evaluators.

Evaluators are trained in many ways, chief among them university programs, professional mentoring, practical experience, and ongoing professional development. The CLEAR initiative—Centers for Learning on Evaluation and Results—is a new approach. With centers in Anglophone and Francophone Africa, CLEAR has set out to strengthen monitoring, evaluation, performance management, and evaluation use at the country level.

While much of CLEAR’s work is face-to-face, a great many organizations have made training material available on the web. One can now piece together free resources online—webinars, documents, videos, correspondence, and even one-on-one meetings with experts—that can result in highly contextualized learning. This is what many of the African evaluators I have met are telling me they are doing.

The US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand appear to be leading exporters of evaluation content to Africa. Claremont Graduate University, Western Michigan University, the American Evaluation Association, the Canadian Government, and BetterEvaluation are some of the better-known sources.

What’s next? Perhaps consolidators who organize online and in-person content into high-quality curricula that are convenient, coherent, and comprehensive.

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Although the supply of evaluators may be limited in many parts of Africa, the demand for evaluation continues to increase. The history of evaluation in the US, Canada, and Europe suggests that demand grows when evaluation is required as a condition of funding or by law. From what I have seen, it appears that history is repeating itself in Africa. In large part this is due to the tremendous influence that funders from outside of Africa have.

An important exception is South Africa, where there government and evaluators work cooperatively to produce and use evaluations. I hope to learn more about this in the days to come.

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AfrEA Conference 2014 #1: What a Difference 32 Hours Makes

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“Tell me again why you are going to Cameroon?” my wife asked. I paused, searching for an answer. New business? Not really, although that is always welcome. Old connections? I have very few among those currently working in Africa. What should I say? How could I explain?

I decided to confess.

“Because I am curious. There is something exciting going on across Africa. The African Evaluation Association—AfrEA—is playing a critical role. I want to learn more about it. Support it. Maybe be a part of it.”

She found that perfectly reasonable. I suppose that is why I married her.

Then she asked more questions about the conference and how my work might be useful to practitioners in that part of the world. As it turns out, she was curious, too. I believe many are, especially evaluation practitioners.

It takes a certain irrational obsessiveness, however, to fly 32 hours because you are curious.

For those not yet prepared to follow their curiosity to such lengths, I will be blogging about the AfrEA Conference over the next week.

You can find guest posts about the previous AfrEA conference in Ghana two years ago here, here, here, and here.

Check back here for the latest conference news from Youndé, Cameroon.

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EvalBlog Launched!

Welcome to EvalBlog.  This where I—and a growing number of guest bloggers—will share our experiences designing and evaluating social, educational, cultural, and environmental programs.  I will draw on my experiences at Gargani + Company.  Guest bloggers will draw on their experiences in various organizations and roles.  Together, we hope to provide a broad view of program design and evaluation. Continue reading

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Big Changes in 2012!

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A new blog for the new year — EvalBlog.comlaunching January 1, 2012.  Join us for a wide-ranging discussion of program design and evaluation, including guest bloggers, conference blogs, and much more!

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Where am I?

My colleagues and I have been busy developing new products and services.  Learn more about what we’ve been up to when we re-launch EvalBlog.com on January 1, 2012.  Stay tuned!

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Santa Cause

I’ve been reflecting on the past year.  What sticks in my mind is how fortunate I am to spend my days working with people who have a cause.  Some promote their causes narrowly, for example, by ensuring that education better serves a group of children or that healthcare is available to the poorest families in a region.  Others pursue causes more broadly, advocating for human rights and social justice.  In the past, both might have been labeled impractical dreamers, utopian malcontents, or, worse, risks to national security.  Yet today they are respected professionals, envied even by those who have achieved great success in more traditional, profit-motivated endeavors.  That’s truly progress.

I also spend a great deal of time buried in the technical details of evaluation—designing research, developing tests and surveys, collecting data, and performing statistical analysis—so I sometimes lose sight of the spirit that animates the causes I serve.  However, it isn’t long before I’m led back to the professionals who, even after almost 20 years, continue to inspire me.  I can’t wait to spend another year working with them.

The next year promises to be more inspiring than ever, and I look forward to sharing my work, my thoughts, and the occasional laugh with all of you in the new year.

Best wishes to all.

John

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AEA 2010 Conference Kicks Off in San Antonio

In the opening plenary of the Evaluation 2010 conference, AEA President Leslie Cooksy invited three leaders in the field—Eleanor Chelimsky, Laura Leviton, and Michael Patton– to speak on The Tensions Among Evaluation Perspectives in the Age of Obama: Influences on Evaluation Quality, Thinking and Values.  They covered topics ranging from how government should use evaluation information to how Jon Stewart of the Daily Show outed himself as an evaluator during his Rally to Restore Sanity/Fear (“I think you know that the success or failure of a rally is judged by only two criteria; the intellectual coherence of the content, and its correlation to the engagement—I’m just kidding.  It’s color and size.  We all know it’s color and size.”)

One piece that resonated with me was Laura Leviton’s discussion of how the quality of an evaluation is related to our ability to apply its results to future programs—what is referred to as generalization.  She presented a graphic that described a possible process for generalization that seemed right to me; it’s what should happen.  But how it happens was not addressed, at least in the short time in which she spoke.  It is no small task to gather prior research and evaluation results, translate them into a small theory of improvement (a program theory), and then adapt that theory to fit specific contexts, values, and resources.  Who should be doing that work?  What are the features that might make it more effective?

Stewart Donaldson and I recently co-authored a paper on that topic that will appear in New Directions for Evaluation in 2011.  We argue that stakeholders are and should be doing this work, and we explore how the logic underlying traditional notions of external validity—considered by some to be outdated—can be built upon to create a relatively simple, collaborative process for predicting the future results of programs.  The paper is a small step toward raising the discussion of external validity (how we judge whether a program will work in the future) to the same level as the discussion of internal validity (how we judge whether a program worked in the past), while trying to avoid the rancor that has been associated with the latter.

More from the conference later.

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Good versus Eval

After another blogging hiatus, the battle between good and eval continues.  Or at least my blog is coming back online as the American Evaluation Association’s Annual Conference in San Antonio (November 10-14) quickly approaches.

I remember that twenty years ago evaluation was widely considered the enemy of good because it took resources away from service delivery.  Now evaluation is widely considered an essential part of service delivery, but the debate over what constitutes a good program and a good evaluation continues.  I will be joining the fray when I make a presentation as part of a session entitled Improving Evaluation Quality by Improving Program Quality: A Theory-Based/Theory-Driven Perspective (Saturday, November 13, 10:00 AM, Session Number 742).  My presentation is entitled The Expanding Profession: Program Evaluators as Program Designers, and I will discuss how program evaluators are increasingly being called upon to help design the programs they evaluate, and why that benefits program staff, stakeholders, and evaluators.  Stewart Donaldson is my co presenter (The Relationship between Program Design and Evaluation), and our discussants are Michael Scriven, David Fetterman, and Charles Gasper.  If you know these names, you know to expect a “lively” (OK, heated) discussion.

If you are an evaluator in California, Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, Hawaii, any other place west of the Mississippi, or anywhere that is west of anything, be sure to attend the West Coast Evaluators Reception Thursday, November 11, 9:00 pm at the Zuni Grill (223 Losoya Street, San Antonio, TX 78205) co-sponsored by San Francisco Bay Area Evaluators and Claremont Graduate University.  It is a conference tradition and a great way to network with colleagues.

More from San Antonio next week!

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