Tag Archives: data-free evaluation

Data-Free Evaluation


George Bernard Shaw quipped, “If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion.”  However, economists should not be singled out on this account — there is an equal share of controversy awaiting anyone who uses theories to solve social problems.  While there is a great deal of theory-based research in the social sciences, it tends to be more theory than research, and with the universe of ideas dwarfing the available body of empirical evidence, there tends to be little if any agreement on how to achieve practical results.  This was summed up well by another master of the quip, Mark Twain, who observed that the fascinating thing about science is how “one gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.”

Recently, economists have been in the hot seat because of the stimulus package.  However, it is the policymakers who depended on economic advice who are sweating because they were the ones who engaged in what I like to call data-free evaluation.  This is the awkward art of judging the merit of untried or untested programs. Whether it takes the form of a president staunching an unprecedented financial crisis, funding agencies reviewing proposals for new initiatives, or individuals deciding whether to avail themselves of unfamiliar services, data-free evaluation is more the rule than the exception in the world of policies and programs. Continue reading


Filed under Commentary, Design, Evaluation, Program Design, Program Evaluation, Research